How Money Talk Can Help Couples?

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Credit: Pixabay

By: MJ Gonzales | Executive Chronicles

Each person has personality that affect his or her strategy in handling things like money matters. That’s why, part of investing assessment is the person’s conservatives or aggressiveness. What if you’re a conservative investor marrying a risk-taker person?

 

Money talk is intimidating topic even for long-time couples. There something about it that is not easy to discuss, but may also cause trouble if they settle amicably.  According to Investopedia, one of the things couple should meticulously discuss is their estate planning particularly if the future of their kids are involved. They should sit down and discuss matters like life insurance, long-term care insurance policy (medical assistance if one would become bed ridden), distribution of joint and marital assets if one or both die, and college education.

 

Joint-account is easy-breezy for couples who have same investing appetite. For those who have different styles, one solutions is to have separate accounts and have compromised agreement what are their responsibilities inside the house. This separation is ideal for investing, not for saving and check account as per Investopedia shared.

 

Credit: stocksnap.io
Credit: stocksnap.io

Prenuptial agreement  is also an ideal choice for couple to have clear blue print of their individual assets and how they want to protect or share those.   In Hollywood, numerous celebrities end filing bankruptcy after divorce like Boxing legend Mike Tyson or separate due to irreconcilable difference.

 

Meantime, Baby Boomer and Millenial couples are most likely planning for their retirement. According to Time’s Money Poll, 91% of boomer and 79% millennial sweethearts are saving for their old days. However, the said report also shared that there are also questions on the knowledge of each other’s retirement account or plan. It revealed that four out of ten millennial couples don’t know their spouse’s accounts, while 40% of them have no idea what their partner’s retirement goals.